Employer Branding

Best recruitment videos (and how to make yours awesome too)

August 17, 2018

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Best recruitment videos (and how to make yours awesome too)

8 min read

People spend 88% more time on a website with video than one without. This is a hard statistic to ignore for employers looking to engage prospective candidates and encourage them to apply to open positions.  Those with a pinch of creative flair have taken to creating their own recruitment videos to inspire, engage and (sometimes) amuse their target audiences.

If you’re struggling to draft your own video, we’ll help you out with a few basic rules of thumb and ten of our favorite recruitment videos. Armed with some inspirational fodder and a few key takeaways, you’ll be well on your way to an awesome video of your own in no time.

What makes a great recruitment video?

Coming up with your own recruiting video can be tough, especially if you’ve never made one before. Below are a few basic elements your video must have to be effective, worthwhile and a positive promotion of your employer brand.

A window into your company

Your video should give prospective candidates a taste of what it looks like to work for your company. This can mean a couple of things, depending on your company. It could mean showing them the workspace and where people spend most of their day. It could also mean showing them where your team might have lunch or a shot of a meeting in action. Your prospective candidates should know what to anticipate when they come in for an interview and hopefully come to work with you.

Introduction to your business

It’s important that your applicants know what exactly it is that your company does. This means that your recruitment video may want to touch on a few of your differentiators or value propositions. Like a sales lead, candidates should be able to determine what’s special about your company and why they would like to work for you (rather than your competitor).

Company values

Your video should also represent and communicate your company values. It will most likely be viewed by prospective candidates who have not yet applied. This presents a great opportunity to make sure your candidates know what you’re about, even before they hit the apply button.

Team composition

Your video should also show what your team looks like and who they can expect to be working with. Studies have shown the value of workplace friendships when it comes to employee retention rates. Make sure your prospective candidates can imagine having a great time with their future colleagues and there’s a social environment they could imagine themselves thriving in.

Engaging & inspirational

The entire purpose of a recruiting video is to engage and inspire candidates to work with you.  You could have all of the above elements of a great recruitment video but without this last piece, your video could fall short of getting candidates to apply. Depending on your company (and your company values) you may choose an emotional note, humor, or prestige. Think about your ideal candidates and consider what might inspire them when selecting their next employer and team.

Our ten favorite recruitment videos

Engaging and inspiring your candidates is the most difficult yet most essential element of creating a great recruitment video. There are a few companies that have managed to master the art of balance being informative, funny and inspirational when it comes to their recruitment videos. We’ve included a list of some of our favorite recruitment and employer branding videos below to help inspire you and with a few reasons why they’re great.

SodaStream: employer brand at the forefront

SodaStream hits a number of targets in this video. Putting aside the fact that they hired the Mountain from Game of Thrones to star in the video, SodaStream drives home their employer brand. Throughout the video they creatively weave in their values and the qualities of their ideal employees: they’re innovative risk-takers with “business courage” looking to hire “rainmakers” and movers-and-shakers. The style of the video reinforces their need to work urgently and for their employees to stay alert. SodaStream even manages to tie in the recruitment video requirements with a walkthrough of the office and warehouse and a team shot at the end.

Okta: non-recruitment recruitment video

This video is not your traditional recruitment video though Okta paints a picture that could easily attract candidates. The video is primarily designed as (sarcastically) a “product video” though hits a many employer branding points. The video takes you through their office, talking to people you might work with as a candidate. Through their sarcasm and dismissive nature of the camera, they show that they’re not a group impressed by buzzwords or product features.

Okta tells you about their product while making fun of themselves and showing you their team environment.

Dropbox: create an unexpected twist

We love the Dropbox recruitment video because takes the standard recruitment video format and adds a twist: puppets. Additionally, they have their puppet employees describe what they love most about working at Dropbox, giving potential candidates insights into the best part of their workplace. Through their employee interviews, Dropbox covers some of their best cultural qualities and benefits. Dropbox manages to make what could be a very standard recruitment video funny by adding their own creative take.

Jaguar: target your audience

Jaguar gets the help of Gorillaz to reach out to software engineers with an important mission: to code for Jaguar.  This is a great example of targeted outreach and a tailored tone and emotional note according to an audience. The exclusivity and urgency of this mission is enough to get anyone excited about working for Jaguar. While we can’t all afford a global music group to support our employer branding, the targeted nature of the video is certainly something to be replicated.

Barclays: make your workforce aspirational

Barclays takes an indirect approach to recruiting by video, highlighting the exclusive and elite nature of their workforce. By focusing on their targeted workforce, their video seeks to inspire others who seek themselves as innovative, top performers.

Zendesk: find humor in the standard format

Zendesk takes a boring recruitment video and makes it well… funny. They use the traditional setup and use repetitive statements in a straightforward way to drive home a straight-talking, no-nonsense attitude. Zendesk refines the art of a sarcastic introduction video while hitting all of the standard elements of a recruitment video.

Fiverr: lean into the cringe

Fiverr takes a humorous approach and, like Zendesk, leans into the generic recruitment video expectation. They state the obvious and they make fun of recruitment video standards: the zoom-ins of an employee or the awkward shots of meetings. While doing this, Fiverr also emphasizes some of their values and points out some of their perks.

New Zealand Police: represent the role in style

The New Zealand Police have created an action-packed and silly recruitment video that’s hard to top. They keep their audience guessing as the identity of the narrator keeps changing (highlighting the diversity of their workforce) and show the ever-changing nature of the job by seamlessly transitioning from scene to scene.  The New Zealand police manage to communicate their goals, their values and some of the perks of the job while keeping their audience thoroughly entertained.

Volvo: use emotion to inspire

The Volvo recruitment video is an excellent example of storytelling with a simple message: Volvo is made by its people. The high-quality filming and beautiful shots paired with on-theme music create an emotional appeal to their audience. The artistic composition of the video certainly inspires and builds a sleek employer brand any candidate would want to be a part of.

LinkedIn: create a social movement

LinkedIn (predictably) makes their employer branding into an employee-led social media movement: #LinkedInLife. They use low-quality employee videos of the day-to-day at LinkedIn for maximum impact: to show how fun it is to work there. They additionally interview employees via video on their phones or computers which creates an informal feeling. LinkedIn manages to communicate a wide range of values coming from various levels of employees. This informal compilation pushes an authentic overview of what it might be like to work at LinkedIn.

Nine tips to inspire and engage

If you’re looking to create a good recruitment or employer branding video, you need to show your workplace, team values and maybe even your company value propositions. If you’re looking to create a great video, it’s a little more complicated. Use some of the following tips learned from our favorite recruitment videos:

  • Put your employer brand at the forefront. Make sure your employer brand is clear, accessible and memorable.
  • Consider taking a non-recruitment angle. Videos can achieve the same results and have the same elements without following the same format.
  • Create an unexpected twist which amuses or surprises. Keep your audience on their toes.
  • Find the humor in the standardized recruitment video format. Be honest that you’re making a video for recruitment and find your angle.
  • Target specific candidates with a tailored message. Be specific when addressing candidates to tap into demographic or professionally-specific aspirations.
  • Make your workforce aspirational. Show your candidates that they could be like your employees if they worked there.
  • Represent the role in style. If you’re looking for dynamic people, make your video fast-paced and exciting.
  • Use emotional notes to inspire. Tap into your audience’s main drivers and use beautiful compositions to connect with them.
  • Create an employee-led social movement. Use your most powerful asset, your employees, to connect and inspire potential candidates.

 

Adrie is a former recruiter and Recruitee's Content Marketing Manager. With a passion for hiring and tech, she is responsible for all the awesome stuff that gets published on this blog.
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